So I said, “technology in schools should be like electricity – it should go unnoticed”

Screen Shot 2016-06-26 at 7.36.55 amCan you imagine what it would have been like to live around the advent of electricity? It was in the 1930s, as Google tells me, that US homes had electricity in the urban areas. We can only imagine what this meant for the average urban family. Reading at night, listening to music, keeping food fresh. Of course, electricity was always ‘there’ (somewhere). The difference came when it was harnessed, supplied and there were appliances like lights, refrigerators and gramophones to really realise its potential. The community quickly became reliant on the appliances, they were reminded of the source, electricity when there was a power outage or when the bill came in the mail. Electricity changed the world.

 

TES.pngEarlier this year I was a panelist at the BETT educational conference in London and technology is an important part of the BETT experience. The panel, hosted by Stephen Heppell and was represented by people from schools like mine, those considered “schools of the future”. We were deep in conversation about learning and design of the space, when an audience member asked the question, “Here we are at BETT, technology is all around us, but none have you have mentioned it at all. So what part does technology play?” (TES article).

My instant thought was, “technology in schools should be like electricity – it should go unnoticed”,

I went on to say to the audience at BETT, “We don’t talk about electricity in education do we? People, when they talk about our school, they say it is technologically advanced. Our principal was quick to see the advantages of technology and [he] was an early adopter of it. But in essence, technology is invisible now. Just like electricity, it’s there, it’s an enabler, it makes the connections work.”

10 years ago at the school where I work, Northern Beaches Christian School in Sydney, technology was a big deal. Networked desktops, computer labs were rolled out across the school. But they were for a purpose, to enable the fledgling learning management system, Moodle, the digital learning space.

In 2016 we actually need to be less enamoured with the ‘sparkly’ elements of technology, less impressed by the sales people and more focused on considering present needs, while simultaneously anticipating the future. Asking the question, “What do my students need now?” and then, “How do I ensure that we are agile enough to roll with the changes?”

techThe series recently aired on ABC (TV) in Australia Revolution School reinforced this point. A student, struggling with school, wanted to leave at the end of Year 10. Her teachers took a “whatever it takes” attitude for her to complete the work she needed to get done. They just needed one more essay. It was delivered by a series of text messages to the teacher’s phone. The essay was thoughtful and reflective and met all the criteria for the student to succeed. The method of delivery mattered less than the goal of success for the student.

Technology has changed the world and the irony of the description of the advent of electricity is not lost. Like electricity, technology has always been ‘there’, we just needed a way for it to be harnessed and supplied. While our ‘appliances’ are the ways we experience electricity, ‘apps’ seem to perform the same function in this parallel universe. Let’s keep perspective, the opportunities that technology brings to our young people and their future are immense.

@anneknock

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