Great Teachers are Learning-Activists not Learning-Pacifists

logo_extendedh_rgb_colour_trans-e1455593082712I have recently began a new chapter in the PhD research project team: ILETC – Innovative Learning Environments and Teacher Change at Melbourne Graduate School of Education (Melbourne University).

Our mission is to discover: Can altering teacher mind frames unlock the potential of innovative learning environments?

Screen Shot 2016-08-21 at 6.02.50 PMCurrently I’m immersed in “teacher mind frames”, a term used by John Hattie in Visible Learning for Teachers (2012) to describe ways of thinking that “underpin our every action and decision in a school”. These mind frames are described by Hattie as “ways of thinking” that are “more likely to have major impacts on student learning”.

 

Mind Frame 2: Teachers/leaders believe that success and failure in student learning is about what they, as teachers or leaders did or did not do… We are change agents! (p.161-162). I love the idea of teacher as change agent.

Teachers need to see themselves as change agents – not as facilitators, developers or constructivists….Teachers believing that achievement is changeable or enhanceable and is never immutable or fixed. (p.162)

They are active. They make change happen. They become learning-activists. But what happens if teachers revert to being learning-pacifist?

So, I have a confession to make. In the late-80s I was a Kindergarten/Prep/Reception and Year 1 teacher. It was in the era of ‘whole language’. A term that is so loaded that people still shudder! I embraced the whole-language approach, as it put language, reading and associated skills within a meaningful context. Just to be clear, I didn’t abandon spelling and grammar, and didn’t have the just-write-anything-learn-by-osmosis approach. In my mind, it was never about “whole language vs phonics and grammar”, it was about instilling a love of language and literature while teaching skills. I supported a both/and approach and to be effectively executed, this required a lot of work.

But, as it seems to happen in education, some saw this as a licence to sit back and many students were significantly disadvantaged, and then the metaphorical pendulum seemed to swing the other way. The learning-pacifists let the rest of us down.

innovateThe language we use matters. Something we may say today can, over time, be distilled into a different meaning. We want to empower our students, using terms like ‘student-owned learning’, ‘teachers as facilitators’ and ‘self-directed learning’. These are essentially great ideas, but it also can’t mean that if students are ‘driving their own learning’, that the teacher might be having a snooze in the back seat.

In the section about Mind Frame #2, Hattie talks about:

“Teachers need to see themselves as change agents – not as facilitators, developers, or constructivists. There role is to change students from what they are to what we want them to be, what we want them to know and understand – and this, of course, highlights the moral purpose of education… teachers believing that achievement is changeable or enhanceable and is never immutable or fixed… a teacher is an enabler not a barrier…learning is about challenge.” (p.192)

A change agent is an active role, it is being an activist, someone who campaigns for change.

Are you in?

@anneknock
www.scil.com.au
www.iletc.com.au

References

Hattie, J. (2012). Visible Learning for Teachers. [electronic resource] : Maximizing Impact on Learning. Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2012.

 

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